translation-problems

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translation-problems

Post by Inai on Fri Jul 31, 2009 7:55 am

Hi
I just startet reading 'Area no Kishi', and right at the first pages I noticed the 1st chapters name whats 'I love football'. I'm sorry but shouldn't that be 'soccer'? Because it's a soccer-game that it's about (or so it seems XD).

The reason why this 'vocabulary' is stil so vivid in my mind, stil after finishing school is, 'cos our teacher insistet in the difference between football and soccer.
He told us, that football implies 'american football' (like that in eyeshield 21), but if you are speaking about something like the 'Jap-Korea-Cup' (some years ago xD)
than it's soccer

I'm sorry I'm not a native-speaker, so I'd like to hear the option of a native speaker ^^

sorry for the trubble

Inai
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Re: translation-problems

Post by justam on Fri Jul 31, 2009 9:34 am

We thank you for your suggestion, but we have chosen to use the term football for a reason. We know 'soccer' is another term for 'football'. However, we've chosen to stick with British English for most of our edits, and over there in England, nobody really uses soccer, they all say football.

Annnnnnd just random evidence to vaguely back us up - Read what FIFA stands for.

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Re: translation-problems

Post by Inai on Fri Jul 31, 2009 5:50 pm

Ok, I just looked up the etymology for football:
"football Look up football at Dictionary.com
the open-air game, first recorded 1409; forbidden in a Scottish statute of 1424. The first reference to the ball itself is 1486. Figurative sense of "something idly kicked around" is first recorded 1532. Ball-kicking games date back to the Roman legions, at least, but the sport seems to have risen to a national obsession in England, c.1630. Rules first regularized at Cambridge, 1848; soccer (q.v.) split off in 1863. The U.S. style (known to some in England as "stop-start rugby with padding") evolved gradually 19c.; the first true collegiate game is considered to have been played Nov. 6, 1869, between Princeton and Rutgers, at Rutgers, but the rules there were more like soccer. A rematch at Princeton Nov. 13, with the home team's rules, was true U.S. football. The earliest recorded application of the word football to this is from 1881."

even there its written, the difference between soccer and football, but I'd asume, that the language envolved, so that maybe the youth would think, that football would be more fitted to say than soccer?

and about wiki, how should I say this, it's nor really a source i'd believe in, even if it may be right
but it's written there, that FIFA was originally (Fédération Internationale de Football Association), thats more french than english, so the english translation may have wanted to be able to use the same letters? I don't know the real reason but that would be the only one reasonable (in my eye's), that is if you really make a difference between football and soccer

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Re: translation-problems

Post by justam on Fri Jul 31, 2009 6:22 pm

Again, we're using British English. Soccer (American) = Football (British). In fact, the proper full name of soccer/football is "Association Football", and "soccer" is really a slang word derived from "Association Football".

I admit, wikipedia's not exactly the most reliable source of information out there, but I would think Encarta (a commercial encyclopedia) can be considered as a more reliable source of information. Check it out. Then click on "Association football".

Assocation Football History, historical development of the most widely played team game in the world and the most popular spectator sport, followed avidly by millions of fans. It is often popularly called “soccer” (especially in the United States), which is a slang term dating from about 1891 as a shortening of “assoc.” or “association”.

I hope that clears up why we use "football" and not "soccer".

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Re: translation-problems

Post by Inai on Fri Jul 31, 2009 9:05 pm

ah
thx, it's good to know (now I don't understand my teacher anymore, who should have thougt us BE instead of AE but he seems to have seriously mixt some things up XD)

anyway thanks für the explanation and translation of AnK XD

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Re: translation-problems

Post by Kouri-chan on Fri Jul 31, 2009 10:02 pm

Are you German?? =O (seeing that you used the u + umlaut.. XD)

Generally, most parts of the world call football football, even in different languages like Fussball in german, zu qiu in Chinese... all translate to football.

The only two countries that I know of are Japan and America that officially use soccer (and Japan is only the katakana)

Although Singapore seems to use soccer a lot too... Ah well~off topic~
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